Sitting at the Feet of Rabbi Jesus: Preview, Part 2

rabbijesusThe following are additional excerpts from Sitting at the Feet of Rabbi Jesus: How the Jewishness of Jesus Can Transform Your Faith, by Ann Spangler and Lois Tverberg, with a few reflections at the end by me. (Buy the book!)

Discipleship

Chapter 4 explains the meaning of “disciple.” We think it means learner or student, but there was much more to it than that.

Modern Christians have sometimes been confused about what discipleship is, equating it with “discipline.” Of course discipline is vital to the spiritual life. … But the overall goal of discipleship is not simply to grow in self-discipline, but to be transformed into the likeness of Christ.

(page 58) Continue reading

Sitting at the Feet of Rabbi Jesus: Preview, Part 1

rabbijesusThe following are excerpts from Sitting at the Feet of Rabbi Jesus: How the Jewishness of Jesus Can Transform Your Faith, by Ann Spangler and Lois Tverberg. (Buy the book!)

Was either Jesus or Paul married?

Many commentators have noted that Paul likely had been married because he claimed to have been “faultless” in terms of legalistic righteousness (Phil 3:6). In the Da Vinci Code, Dan Brown makes the argument that Jesus must have been married because all observant Jews had married by age 30.

However, the authors note,

Most Jewish men married at a fairly young age, often between the ages of eighteen and twenty. But [Brown] seems ignorant of the fact that rabbinic scholars spent many years in study and travel, causing some to postpone marriage until much later in life.  … It was not uncommon for such men to marry in their late thirties or forties. Continue reading

Sitting at the Feet of the Rabbi Jesus

rabbijesusI’ve been reading Sitting at the Feet of Rabbi Jesus: How the Jewishness of Jesus Can Transform Your Faith, by Ann Spangler and Lois Tverberg, in bits and pieces over the last several days. And I believe it’s become one of my all time favorite books. I mean, I just love this book!

I’ve got a stack of books I’ve been meaning to comment on, including several others on the Jewish roots of the New Testament, and this is the best I’ve come across so far. I think the reason I like this one so much is because it seems to be written by teachers rather than preachers or scholars.

You see, preachers like to take one really good point and write a chapter on it. It doesn’t take long to read their books, because I can skip the illustrations, you know. Continue reading