Wiki-Lessons: 1 Samuel 19 – 20 (David’s Escape from Saul)

Saul threatens David’s life

(1Sa 19:1-7 ESV) And Saul spoke to Jonathan his son and to all his servants, that they should kill David. But Jonathan, Saul’s son, delighted much in David.  2 And Jonathan told David, “Saul my father seeks to kill you. Therefore be on your guard in the morning. Stay in a secret place and hide yourself.  3 And I will go out and stand beside my father in the field where you are, and I will speak to my father about you. And if I learn anything I will tell you.”

4 And Jonathan spoke well of David to Saul his father and said to him, “Let not the king sin against his servant David, because he has not sinned against you, and because his deeds have brought good to you.  5 For he took his life in his hand and he struck down the Philistine, and the LORD worked a great salvation for all Israel. You saw it, and rejoiced. Why then will you sin against innocent blood by killing David without cause?”  6 And Saul listened to the voice of Jonathan. Saul swore, “As the LORD lives, he shall not be put to death.”

7 And Jonathan called David, and Jonathan reported to him all these things. And Jonathan brought David to Saul, and he was in his presence as before.

(1Sa 19:8-17 ESV)  8 And there was war again. And David went out and fought with the Philistines and struck them with a great blow, so that they fled before him.  9 Then a harmful spirit from the LORD came upon Saul, as he sat in his house with his spear in his hand. And David was playing the lyre.  10 And Saul sought to pin David to the wall with the spear, but he eluded Saul, so that he struck the spear into the wall. And David fled and escaped that night.

11 Saul sent messengers to David’s house to watch him, that he might kill him in the morning. But Michal, David’s wife, told him, “If you do not escape with your life tonight, tomorrow you will be killed.”  12 So Michal let David down through the window, and he fled away and escaped.

13 Michal took an image and laid it on the bed and put a pillow of goats’ hair at its head and covered it with the clothes.  14 And when Saul sent messengers to take David, she said, “He is sick.”  15 Then Saul sent the messengers to see David, saying, “Bring him up to me in the bed, that I may kill him.”  16 And when the messengers came in, behold, the image was in the bed, with the pillow of goats’ hair at its head.

17 Saul said to Michal, “Why have you deceived me thus and let my enemy go, so that he has escaped?”

And Michal answered Saul, “He said to me, ‘Let me go. Why should I kill you?’”

Michal and Jonathan helped David escape the wrath of their father Saul. In fact, Michal lied to her father for David’s sake, pretending that he’d threatened her life so that he could escape.

The Spirit overcomes Saul

Now, this is a strange story –

(1Sa 19:18-1 ESV)  18 Now David fled and escaped, and he came to Samuel at Ramah and told him all that Saul had done to him. And he and Samuel went and lived at Naioth.  19 And it was told Saul, “Behold, David is at Naioth in Ramah.”  20 Then Saul sent messengers to take David, and when they saw the company of the prophets prophesying, and Samuel standing as head over them, the Spirit of God came upon the messengers of Saul, and they also prophesied.  21 When it was told Saul, he sent other messengers, and they also prophesied. And Saul sent messengers again the third time, and they also prophesied.

22 Then he himself went to Ramah and came to the great well that is in Secu. And he asked, “Where are Samuel and David?” And one said, “Behold, they are at Naioth in Ramah.”  23 And he went there to Naioth in Ramah. And the Spirit of God came upon him also, and as he went he prophesied until he came to Naioth in Ramah.  24 And he too stripped off his clothes, and he too prophesied before Samuel and lay naked all that day and all that night. Thus it is said, “Is Saul also among the prophets?”

Notice that God’s Spirit had the ability to come upon Saul’s messengers and even Saul himself so that they would “prophesy” uncontrollably. The effect was so profound that Saul stripped off his own clothes and prophesied naked day and night.

It’s hard to imagine that this “prophecy” is prophecy in the nature of an Isaiah or Jeremiah. The words he spoke, if there were any, aren’t recorded. The point is clearly that he lost control of himself.

Jonathan warns David to flee

The following passage is hardly a model of narrative economy, but it’s here for a reason. The text helps us see the extent of Saul’s hatred of David, some of his motivation, and Jonathan’s remarkable love for David.

(1Sa 20:1-42 ESV) Then David fled from Naioth in Ramah and came and said before Jonathan, “What have I done? What is my guilt? And what is my sin before your father, that he seeks my life?”

2 And he said to him, “Far from it! You shall not die. Behold, my father does nothing either great or small without disclosing it to me. And why should my father hide this from me? It is not so.”

Jonathan didn’t realize that Saul was hiding his hatred for David from him.

3 But David vowed again, saying, “Your father knows well that I have found favor in your eyes, and he thinks, ‘Do not let Jonathan know this, lest he be grieved.’ But truly, as the LORD lives and as your soul lives, there is but a step between me and death.”

4 Then Jonathan said to David, “Whatever you say, I will do for you.”

5 David said to Jonathan, “Behold, tomorrow is the new moon, and I should not fail to sit at table with the king. But let me go, that I may hide myself in the field till the third day at evening.  6 If your father misses me at all, then say, ‘David earnestly asked leave of me to run to Bethlehem his city, for there is a yearly sacrifice there for all the clan.’  7 If he says, ‘Good!’ it will be well with your servant, but if he is angry, then know that harm is determined by him.  8 Therefore deal kindly with your servant, for you have brought your servant into a covenant of the LORD with you. But if there is guilt in me, kill me yourself, for why should you bring me to your father?”

9 And Jonathan said, “Far be it from you! If I knew that it was determined by my father that harm should come to you, would I not tell you?”

10 Then David said to Jonathan, “Who will tell me if your father answers you roughly?”

11 And Jonathan said to David, “Come, let us go out into the field.” So they both went out into the field.  12 And Jonathan said to David, “The LORD, the God of Israel, be witness! When I have sounded out my father, about this time tomorrow, or the third day, behold, if he is well disposed toward David, shall I not then send and disclose it to you?  13 But should it please my father to do you harm, the LORD do so to Jonathan and more also if I do not disclose it to you and send you away, that you may go in safety. May the LORD be with you, as he has been with my father.  14 If I am still alive, show me the steadfast love of the LORD, that I may not die;  15 and do not cut off your steadfast love from my house forever, when the LORD cuts off every one of the enemies of David from the face of the earth.”

16 And Jonathan made a covenant with the house of David, saying, “May the LORD take vengeance on David’s enemies.”  17 And Jonathan made David swear again by his love for him, for he loved him as he loved his own soul.

Clearly, by now David had shared his anointing with Jonathan. Jonathan asked David to “not cut off your steadfast love from my house forever.” In other words, when you become king, don’t kill me and my family! Thus, Jonathan effectively yielded his throne to David.

18 Then Jonathan said to him, “Tomorrow is the new moon, and you will be missed, because your seat will be empty.  19 On the third day go down quickly to the place where you hid yourself when the matter was in hand, and remain beside the stone heap.  20 And I will shoot three arrows to the side of it, as though I shot at a mark.  21 And behold, I will send the young man, saying, ‘Go, find the arrows.’ If I say to the young man, ‘Look, the arrows are on this side of you, take them,’ then you are to come, for, as the LORD lives, it is safe for you and there is no danger.  22 But if I say to the youth, ‘Look, the arrows are beyond you,’ then go, for the LORD has sent you away.  23 And as for the matter of which you and I have spoken, behold, the LORD is between you and me forever.”

24 So David hid himself in the field. And when the new moon came, the king sat down to eat food.  25 The king sat on his seat, as at other times, on the seat by the wall. Jonathan sat opposite, and Abner sat by Saul’s side, but David’s place was empty.  26 Yet Saul did not say anything that day, for he thought, “Something has happened to him. He is not clean; surely he is not clean.”  27 But on the second day, the day after the new moon, David’s place was empty. And Saul said to Jonathan his son, “Why has not the son of Jesse come to the meal, either yesterday or today?”

28 Jonathan answered Saul, “David earnestly asked leave of me to go to Bethlehem.  29 He said, ‘Let me go, for our clan holds a sacrifice in the city, and my brother has commanded me to be there. So now, if I have found favor in your eyes, let me get away and see my brothers.’ For this reason he has not come to the king’s table.”  30 Then Saul’s anger was kindled against Jonathan, and he said to him, “You son of a perverse, rebellious woman, do I not know that you have chosen the son of Jesse to your own shame, and to the shame of your mother’s nakedness?  31 For as long as the son of Jesse lives on the earth, neither you nor your kingdom shall be established. Therefore send and bring him to me, for he shall surely die.”

We now see that Saul perceived that David would take the throne from him — perhaps because of his great popularity with the people or perhaps because he’d caught wind of Samuel’s anointing. But I think Saul saw it in terms of power derived from David’s popularity.

32 Then Jonathan answered Saul his father, “Why should he be put to death? What has he done?”

33 But Saul hurled his spear at him to strike him. So Jonathan knew that his father was determined to put David to death.  34 And Jonathan rose from the table in fierce anger and ate no food the second day of the month, for he was grieved for David, because his father had disgraced him.

How had Saul disgraced Jonathan?

35 In the morning Jonathan went out into the field to the appointment with David, and with him a little boy.  36 And he said to his boy, “Run and find the arrows that I shoot.” As the boy ran, he shot an arrow beyond him.  37 And when the boy came to the place of the arrow that Jonathan had shot, Jonathan called after the boy and said, “Is not the arrow beyond you?”  38 And Jonathan called after the boy, “Hurry! Be quick! Do not stay!” So Jonathan’s boy gathered up the arrows and came to his master.  39 But the boy knew nothing. Only Jonathan and David knew the matter.  40 And Jonathan gave his weapons to his boy and said to him, “Go and carry them to the city.”

41 And as soon as the boy had gone, David rose from beside the stone heap and fell on his face to the ground and bowed three times. And they kissed one another and wept with one another, David weeping the most.  42 Then Jonathan said to David, “Go in peace, because we have sworn both of us in the name of the LORD, saying, ‘The LORD shall be between me and you, and between my offspring and your offspring, forever.’” And he rose and departed, and Jonathan went into the city.

Thus begins the story of David’s flight from Saul.

Notes:

Throughout the stories of David, we need to discuss with the class why David is a “man after God’s own heart.” What makes David so special that God chose to beget his Son through the Davidic dynasty? Why seat Jesus on David’s throne?

David is obviously a flawed character (the Bible does not romanticize its heroes), and so it’s not his sinlessness or moral perfection. What qualities endear him to God? Ultimately, what qualities should we emulate?

In the flight stories, notice that David flees to Samuel and then to the tabernacle and God’s priests first. You can judge much about a person by how he responds to stress. Compare how David and Saul each react to the stress of having their kingship threatened.

Also, compare on whom each relies. Saul relies on Saul and brute force. David relies on God.

Notice how each treats the Lord’s anointed. Why does David treat Saul with deference even though he is trying to kill David?

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About Jay Guin

I am an elder, a Sunday school teacher, a husband, a father, a grandfather, and a lawyer. I live in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, home of the Alabama Crimson Tide. I’m a member of the University Church of Christ. I grew up in Russellville, Alabama and graduated from David Lipscomb College (now Lipscomb University). I received my law degree from the University of Alabama. I met my wife Denise at Lipscomb, and we have four sons, two of whom are married, and I have a grandson and granddaughter.
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One Response to Wiki-Lessons: 1 Samuel 19 – 20 (David’s Escape from Saul)

  1. Laymond says:

    "Then a harmful spirit from the LORD came upon Saul,"
    Jay is this the "holy spirit" you say lives in all Christians. or is it the spirit of jealousy, that lives in us, the same way that the spirit of holiness does?

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